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Eastern indigo snakes released in Bristol in effort to return native species to region

Wednesday, 12 young eastern indigo snakes were released in North Florida as part of the The...
Wednesday, 12 young eastern indigo snakes were released in North Florida as part of the The Nature Conservancy’s efforts to return the native snake to the region.(The Nature Conservancy)
Updated: May. 26, 2021 at 8:51 PM EDT
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BRISTOL, Fla. (WCTV) - Wednesday, 12 young eastern indigo snakes were released in North Florida as part of the The Nature Conservancy’s efforts to return the native snake to the region.

Eastern indigo snakes, which are non-venomous apex predators, are listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. These dozen snakes were released into the wild, marking year five of The Nature Conservancy’s 10-year program.

The collaborative effort brings the snake to a protected habitat of The Nature Conservancy’s Apalachicola Bluffs and Ravines Preserve (ABRP) in Bristol to create a growing population to support species recovery.

According to The Nature Conservancy, this species recovery effort in North Florida is the long-term joint commitment of a number of nonprofit, agency and academic partners who have worked together for decades to restore and manage the habitat required by the snake.

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